Welcome to CR Ranch

Back in 1991 Rick decided to start raising a few colts that he could start then sell. Not sure which way he wanted to go we went through more than a few different bloodlines trying to find the one that worked for us.

As time went on we started to find that both Hancock and Leo bred horses seemed to stand up the best for the working cowboys that we sold our young geldings to.

Then in the late 90s Rick bought a young gelding at a sale when he heard a name on the pedigree that he'd been looking for. That name was Driftwood, and it changed our outlook almost overnight.

There weren't a lot of Driftwoods in the country back then but a few years later we were fortunate enough to meet Don & Iren Woitte and form a lasting friendship. Don was also a fan of the Driftwood horses and we were lucky enough to purchase Fintry Driftwood Ike from him in 2006. Both of these horses demonstrated the temperament and athletic ability that Driftwoods are so well known for. We were also able to purchase several mares and fillies from the Woitte's that are daughters of their Driftwood sire, Fintry Drift Hancock.Several of those mares go back to Joe Hancock and crossing them with our Driftwood sire creates that Golden Cross that is so sought after by working cowboys across the southwest states.

Now after years of breeding mares, culling, and hundreds of miles on both sides of the border we believe that we are starting to get a nice group of mares together that carry the Driftwood line.

Here at CR Ranch we do our best to raise good "usin" horses that you can ride all week on the pasture and haul to a rodeo on the weekend.

So give us a call or stop by for a coffee. We'll do our best to set you up with the right horse for whatever direction you want to go.

Driftwood

“Driftwood” a bay stallion was foaled in 1932. His sire “Miller Boy” by “Hobart Horse” who was thought to be sired by “John Wilkins” by “Peter McCue.” “Miller Boy” was out of “Wilie” a daughter of “Texas Chief.” “Driftwoods” dam was “The Comer Mare” by “Barlow” by “Lock’s Rondo.” The combination of early speed sent the young stallion to the race track where he was successfully matched at distances from 220 yards to 3/8’s of a mile. In the late 1930’s he ended up in the hands of the Nichols’ family at Gilbert, Arizona. While he was with the Nichols’ he was matched against, and outran, the legendary “Clabber” a World’s Champion Quarter Running Horse.

Driftwood Breeds

Jimmy Williams, who was one of the most renowned stock horse and hunter jumper trainers of all time, was quoted as saying in Legends Vol II, "They are the best. You ask them to do anything and they'll do it. They want to learn, and they have the ability to do something when you've finished with them. I think 'Speedy' is as good a sire as there is any place."

Buck Nichols introduced “Driftwood” to the roping arena and rodeoed on the horse. In 1941 Asbury Schell had him and nicknamed him “Speedy” cause of the way he could catch cattle over a long roping score. Speedy, as he was called by ropers, was a great rope horse and was used in team roping , calf roping, steer tripping and bulldogging all in the same day. As a nine year old “Driftwood” became a fixture at the big rodeos around the country. In 1943 Katy & Channing Peake bought “Driftwood” from Schell for $1,500 and moved him to Rancho Jabali where they registered him with the AQHA and was retired to stud.

Driftwood stood anywhere from 14.3 to 15 hands and showed adequate bone and foot size. Driftwood was a very well balanced individual and showed an alertness that is still evident in his progeny. He was an extremely fast horse and devoured ducking and diving calves. He was a tough horse and his sturdiness was shown in his years of racing and traveling on the rodeo circuit.

“Driftwoods” ability to sire quick speed, performance ability, the mental attitude to retain training, functional conformation and physical stamina to stand up under hard use, and carry the traits on down through the generations, is what made “Driftwood” unique among stallions. Many stallions are out standing performers themselves but are not able to pass that same talent on down through the generations. “Driftwood” did. They are known to be very trainable and excellent at any event they were asked to perform in. Driftwood has had winners in virtually every event possible including barrel racing, reining, working cow horse, roping, cutting and western riding. They are known to be graceful movers and are very cowy. They are also known to be huge stoppers.

Driftwood

Barrel racers are finding the Driftwoods make excellent barrel horses. They have a natural rate to them and have a quick start out of the barrel. They are easy to train and can handle the pressures of training. Great barrel horse that carry Driftwood blood include French Flash Hawk aka Bozo who was a 4 time PRCA barrel racing horse of the year and Firewater Fiesta who is a 1 time PRCA barrel racing horse of the year.

During the following seventeen years, “Driftwood” sired a whole arena full of top performers in the show ring, the race track, and the rodeo arena. For over a half a century a bay stallion has passed down his own tremendous performance ability and, in the process given horsemen something that they were proud to ride. An old rodeo adage is, “A man has to be well mounted to win” and with a “Driftwood” he was. Today, sixty plus years after he was foaled, his blood is still sought after by cowboys. “Driftwood” died on October, 20 1960. He left many great son’s and daughter’s of his such as “Hallie Wood”, “Woodwind”, “Henny Penny Peake”, “Brown Beulah”, “Wood Wasp”, “Drifty”, “Woodfern”, “Miss Linwood”, “O See O”, “Judy Sue”, “Annie Wood”, “Kitty Wood”, “Rosewood”, “Drifting Sage”, “Easy Keeper”, “Chelena”, “Maestro”, “Speedy II”, “Poker Chip”, “Speedy Wood”, “Speedy Peake”, and “Driftwood Ike”, as well as a herd of others.

Quotes

Forty-seven World Championships and 170 NFR Qualifiers... the Driftwoods are Pro Rodeo's most successful performance horses!

The only way Driftwood can hurt a horse's pedigree is if he doesn't have any Driftwood in it!

When you think great horses you have to think Driftwoods.

There was something in that Driftwood blood. His colts are quiet, athletic, and did whatever you wanted. There will never be another stallion like him.

Pro's who ride Driftwood Horses

Clay O’Brien Cooper
PRCA Hall of Fame member, has won 7 World Champion Team Roping titles, has won over $2,134,000 roping and has qualified for the WNFR 22 times. His horse Supai Drifter (nicknamed Ike) finished second in the PRCA/AQHA Team Roping Heel Horse of the Year race in 2004.
Wade Wheatley
Qualified (heading) for the NFR 2000-2002 on a Driftwood gelding. Has qualified for the WNFR 6 times and has won over $779,000 heading.
Kristie Peterson
Four-time world champion and three-time reserve world champion WPRA barrel racer. Her horse Bozo (French Flash Hawk) who carried her to those titles has won AQHA Barrel horse of the year 5 times. He is a great grandson of Driftwood Ike.
Todd Suhn
Has qualified for the WNFR 10 times and won over $1,100,000 as a steer wrestler.
Mike Beers
World Champion Heeler, (Won the world on a full brother to White Lighting Ike) has won over $1,800,000 and qualified for the WNFR 20 times.
Reg Camarillo
(many time NFR qualifier in Team Roping)
Allen Bach
(many time World Champion Heeler)
Tom Fergusen
(6 time All-Around World Champion)
Cory Petska
Has won over $533,000 heeling, he has qualified for the WNFR 4 times. In 2006 he placed in 5 out of 10 rounds at the WNFR. In 2005 he and partner Tee Woolman won the average at the WNFR placing in 7 out of 10 rounds and finished as World Champion Runner-Up

Understanding the 5-panel and Other Equine Genetics

What is 5-Panel testing?

The 5-panel is test for five different genetic diseases found in quarter horses and other stock horse breeds. The diseases tested for in the 5-panel are PSSM1, HERDA, GBED, HYPP, and MH. Starting in 2014 any AQHA stallion breeding 25 or more mares must be 5-panel tested through AQHA/UC Davis before their 2015 foals can be registered. Starting in 2015 ALL AQHA stallions must be 5-panel tested before their 2016 foals can be registered.

What do PSSM , HERDA, GBED, HYPP, and MH stand for?

PSSM
Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy -The University of Minnesota describes Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy or PSSM (PSSM1) an inherited muscle disease that affects many and diverse breeds of horses. The clinical characteristics of PSSM vary between breeds, from muscle pain, cramping and cell damage with exercise, to progressive muscle atrophy. Our previous work lead to the discovery of a dominant genetic mutation in the GYS1 gene that is responsible for PSSM in many horses (McCue et al 2008). This mutation results in the accumulation of abnormal complex sugars within skeletal muscle of horses. This form of PSSM is termed Type 1 PSSM. More information about the breeds affected with Type 1 PSSM can be found here: Equine Neuromuscular Lab. Subsequent work in our laboratory has also demonstrated that a mutation in a second gene important in muscle function RYR1, can make the clinical signs of PSSM worse in certain individuals (McCue et al 2009). There are no "carriers" of PSSM. PSSM is a dominant disorder. Which means a horse only has to carry one copy of the disease to be affected. If the horse tests PSSM positive, he has the disease and should not be bred.
PSSM N/N
Horse tested negative for PSSM and does not carry the PSSM gene mutations. The horse will not pass on the defective mutations to its offspring.
PSSM n/P1
Both the normal and PSSM alleles were detected. Horse tested heterozygous for PSSM. The horse is affected with the PSSM genetic disorder and there is a 50% chance that this horse will pass a PSSM allele to its offspring.
PSSM P1/P1
Positive for the dominant PSSM gene mutations, indicates the animal carries two inherited copies. Homozygous PSSM horses are genetically bound to pass the gene to 100% of their progeny when bred meaning all foals will be have at least one copy of the dominant PSSM gene mutation.
HERDA
Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia. Also known as Hyperelastosis Cutis, HC is a genetic skin disease predominantly found in the American Quarter Horse. Researchers at Mississippi State University and Cornell University believe that the origin of this genetic disorder may be the Poco Bueno's sire line. The symptom of this disorder is a lack of adhesion within the layers of skin due to a genetic defect in the collagen that holds the skin in place. This defect causes the outer layer of skin to split or separate from the deeper layers, sometimes tearing off completely. Areas under the saddle seem to be most prone to these lesions, often leaving permanent scars and preventing the horse from being ridden.
The disorder is recessive, which means that a horse must be homozygous positive or have two copies of the defective gene to suffer from the disease. Consequently, both the sire and the dam must possess at least one copy of the mutated gene in order for the offspring to be afflicted. Offspring born with one copy of the defective gene and one non-defective copy are considered a carrier and have a 50% chance of passing the defective gene on, but are in no way affected by carrying the gene. They are just like any other horse. HERDA only comes into play when you go to breed your horse. If the horse is a carrier, it must only be bred to tested N/N stallions/mares
HERDA N/N
Horse tested negative for the gene mutation that causes HERDA and will not pass on the defective gene to its offspring
HERDA Hrd/N
Both the normal and mutant copies of the gene detected. Horse is a carrier for the HERDA mutation and can pass on a copy of the defective gene to its offspring 50% 0f the time.
HERDA Hrd/Hrd
The horse carries two copies of the HERDA mutation and is homozygous for HERDA. The horse is affected with the HERDA genetic disorder.
GBED
Glycogen Branching Enzyme Deficiency (GBED) is a fatal condition caused by the bodies' inability to properly store sugar. In a normal horse, the body stores sugar as energy by converting glucose to glycogen. This inherited disorder prevents the body from producing the enzyme needed to branch the glycogen structure, preventing the horse from being able to adequately store the sugars. This means that the horse will not be able to store enough energy to fuel important organs, such as the muscles and brain.
Foals born which are affected by GBED suffer from a range of symptoms associated with this lack of fuel, such as low energy, weakness and difficulty rising. Other symptoms include low body temperature, contracted muscles, seizures, and sudden death. Unfortunately, GBED is always fatal; most affected foals will die before the age of 8 weeks. GBED often causes the foetus to be aborted in utero. Research suggests that as many as 3% of aborted Quarter Horse foals were homozygous for the GBED mutation.
Studies show that the mutation responsible for GBED is carried by as many as 10% of Quarter Horse, Paint Horse breeds and related breeds. GBED is an autosomal recessive trait, meaning a foal can only be affected if the foal inherits the disease from both parents. Horses that are carriers of the GBED have one copy of the mutation but do not have any symptoms associated with the disorder. This makes DNA testing important to screen for carriers and prevent this fatal condition. GBED is a recessive disorder and it takes two copies of the gene for the horse to be affected. Horses carrying only one copy are not affected by the gene and are just like any other horse. GBED only comes into play when you go to breed your horse. If the horse is a carrier, it must only be bred to tested N/N stallions/mares.
GBED N/N
Horse tested negative for the gene mutation that causes GBED and will not pass on the defective gene to its offspring.
GBED N/Gb
Both the normal and mutant copies of the gene detected. Horse is a carrier for the GBED mutation, and can pass on a copy of the defective gene to its offspring 50% 0f the time.
GBED Gb/Gb
The horse carries two copies of the GBED mutation and is homozygous for GBED. The horse is affected with the GBED genetic disorder.
HYPP
Equine Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis Disease (HYPP) is a muscular disease caused by an inherited genetic mutation. HYPP has been traced back to one horse named Impressive and has the alternative name, Impressive Syndrome, named after this horse. Symptoms of HYPP may include muscle twitching, unpredictable paralysis attacks which can lead to sudden death, and respiratory noises. Severity of attacks varies from unnoticeable to collapse or sudden death. The cause of death is usually respiratory failure and/or cardiac arrest.
HYPP is a dominant disorder meaning both homozygous positive (HH) and heterozygous (nH) horses will be affected. Only homozygous negative (nn) horses are not affected by HYPP. If a horse tests HYPP positive, he has the disease and should not be bred.
HYPP N/N
Horse tested negative for the gene mutation that causes HYPP and will not pass on the defective gene to its offspring
HYPP N/H
Both the normal and HYPP alleles were detected. Horse tested heterozygous for HYPP. The horse is affected with the HYPP genetic disorder and there is a 50% chance this horse will pass a HYPP allele to its offspring.
HYPP H/H
Positive for dominant HYPP gene, indicates the animal carries two inherited copies. Homozygous HYPP horses are genetically bound to pass the gene to 100% of their progeny when bred and all foals will be HYPP horses. AQHA no longer allows the registration of HYPP H/H horses.
MH
Malignant Hyperthermia or MH is a genetic muscle disorder that affects Quarter Horses and related breeds. Horses with the MH mutation may not show any physical signs of the disorder until triggered by exposure to anesthesia or extreme exercise or stress. Symptoms can include high temperature, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, sweating, acidosis, and muscle rigidity. Symptoms develop rapidly, and if not treated quickly, this condition can be fatal.
MH is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, so the disorder can be passed on even if only one parent has the defective gene. The mutation can be present along with PSSM and if a horse also has PSSM, the symptoms associated with MH can be more severe. Therefore, testing for both PSSM and MH is recommended for Quarter Horse breeds.
Although this condition is rare, testing for MH is recommended in case a horse must undergo anesthesia. Horses that are known to have the MH mutation can be given medication prior to administering anesthesia to help reduce the severity of the symptoms. MH is another dominant disorder and horses testing positve for it should not be bred.
MH N/N
Horse tested negative for MH and does not carry the MH gene mutation. The horse will not pass on the defective gene to its offspring.
MH N/MH
Both the normal and MH alleles were detected. Horse tested heterozygous for MH. The horse is affected with the MH disorder and there is a 50% chance this horse will pass a MH allele to its offspring.
MH MH/MH
Positive for dominant MH mutation, indicates the animal carries two inherited copies. Homozygous MH horses are genetically bound to pass the gene to 100% of their progeny when bred and all foals will be MH horses.